Writer  Photographer
Occasional thaumaturge

 
Alberto Yáñez is a writer of fantasies, poetry, and essays on justice, agency and art, pop culture, and the absurdity of life. With the instincts of a natural editor, he’s also a photographer with a storyteller’s approach to taking pictures.
 
Every so often, a wonder gets worked.

The Practicalities of Wellbeing and Being Well

A long time ago, when I was in high school in the early 1990’s, I was a peer counselor. My local county health and human services administration had a program where they taught some of us high school students the … Continue reading

November 27, 2013

new story published!

For relative values of “new,” I suppose. The first draft was written in 2011. “The Coffinmaker’s Love” had its start at Clarion West. It was the first story that I wrote there, on Week Two, with Nancy Kress instructing. Week One … Continue reading

October 4, 2013

as the hours wind down

I can feel Yom Kippur approaching. The turn of time is inexorable and I feel the gathering up of whispers, susurrations of lives lived and days spent, the rustle of divine fingers on the Book of Life and the Book … Continue reading

September 13, 2013

“Recognizing Gabe” is up for Best PodCastle Story of 2012

“Recognizing Gabe: un cuento de hadas” is in the final round of audience polling for Best PodCastle Story of 2012. I am astonished and utterly delighted. Go vote! Listen to all the stories–they’re all good. Wow. I love the story, so … Continue reading

March 22, 2013
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The Coffinmaker's Love

Miss Lavinia Parrish was a young woman when she chose to apprentice herself to Mr Harid de Borba, a coffinmaker of great skill but odd repute. Though the two were acquainted prior to her request, Miss Parrish had not laid bare her heart to her new master, nor had she otherwise explained her particular reasons for undertaking a trade.

Driving for Peanuts

It took four of them to drive the rig, plus Bobo to steer.

Petey handled the clutch, Lulu was on brakes and gas, Jojo took care of shifting gears, and Alice ran relief for the other three and mostly told them what to do. Bobo steered, of course, since he had enough upper-body strength to turn the wheel, and with the booster seat could see over the dash. He was a chimp, but the rest of the crew tried not to hold it against him.